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2016

We’ve seen it many times. Healthcare providers engaged in mergers and acquisitions embark on the implementation for a rebranding only to get stymied by unforeseen stakeholder concerns. What sets healthcare rebrandings apart from others is that hospitals and health systems face more potential issues because of the number and nature of constituencies involved.

When Fortune 50 clients like Hewlett-Packard and Verizon consider engaging BrandActive, they often have one critical question on their mind - how much is their rebrand going to cost? It doesn’t matter if it’s a merger, acquisition, or rebranding of an existing enterprise, executives are eager to know what the price tag will be to move out the old and bring in the new.

Successfully getting the approval for a rebranding program by the board and or leadership team may depend entirely on how the costs affect fiscal-year operating income. If a CMO goes into a board meeting and proposes a multimillion dollar rebranding budget with the entire cost hitting the P & L in the current fiscal year, it may be much more difficult to get approval than if he or she takes a financial planning stance that spreads the costs over a number of fiscal periods.

2015

With the flood of change in healthcare today, you could forgive consumers if they cited “confusion” rather than “clarity” to describe how they feel about the future of their insurance coverage. With the constant reshaping of plans and programs, patients easily get disoriented, whether before, during, or after a trip through the system. This is especially true if they or their loved ones are medically stressed or handicapped.

We all know about Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will.” In the course of many rebrandings, we’ve uncovered a few examples. In one case, just before the grand opening of a new location—at which a new sign was to be unveiled at just the right moment—the sign vendor shipped the wrong sign cover.