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2015

With the flood of change in healthcare today, you could forgive consumers if they cited “confusion” rather than “clarity” to describe how they feel about the future of their insurance coverage. With the constant reshaping of plans and programs, patients easily get disoriented, whether before, during, or after a trip through the system. This is especially true if they or their loved ones are medically stressed or handicapped.

We all know about Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will.” In the course of many rebrandings, we’ve uncovered a few examples. In one case, just before the grand opening of a new location—at which a new sign was to be unveiled at just the right moment—the sign vendor shipped the wrong sign cover.

At its core, logistics is the careful planning towards anticipated outcomes, as well as the resolve and experience to still achieve those outcomes when the unexpected occurs. Given this is a piece about risk, lets dispose the first part of that definition referring to the ideal projects where perfect planning leads to excellent results, and recognize that complex projects are laden with risk. So, in that context how do you test the mettle of people managing the logistics of a rebranding? You see how they expect the unexpected. You see how their experience and grasp of the situation has led to back-up planning, creative problem solving, and the ability to call upon the data and past experience to continue to keep the train on the rails.

How does a global company roll out “the next new thing?” Deploy it in hundreds of offices? In dozens of countries? To legions of employees? To thousands of customers and prospects? These days, corporations rely on analytics and sophisticated logistics that drive thousands of point decisions in parallel.

When architects create a conceptual design for a structure, they talk with clients, take a few measurements, and come up with a floor plan that documents a grand strategy. But the initial plan, even once approved, remains pie in the sky until a host of added data and additional measurements are obtained. Builders of the new structure will need specifics on everything from building materials to electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and so on. Only when they get the so-called “working drawings” can they get started with moving dirt, pouring concrete, and erecting walls.