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Posts by Andrew Pollock

If your energy firm is like most, it’s structured as a B2B enterprise. Management emphasizes sales and building relationships with a core set of customers. Brand often takes a back seat. So, when the business needs to rebrand because of a transaction or new business strategy, brand marketers can find it difficult to convey the strategic and financial value of brand and the need to properly fund brand conversion. Those marketers who can put rebranding implementation into financial terms, addressing cost management and ROI, have a head start. They can turn brand change into an opportunity to move forward with strategic brand priorities.

There’s nothing like a rebrand effort to make you appreciate the extent of your branded assets.

Planning for the rollout of a new identity demands an accurate inventory and accounting of each and every instance of your company name, logo and colors across your portfolio. Your team must think beyond the obvious digital and physical marketing collateral — signage, fleet, badges, uniforms and more, depending on your industry.

Our competitive global economy — ripe for major transactions including mergers, acquisitions, splits spin-offs and affiliations — means every chief marketer can expect to manage a complex, large-scale rebranding at some point in his or her career. However, it is common for executives charged with leading a brand change to lack a clear line of sight into the financial and operational implications involved in these complex projects — even with a great depth of knowledge about the company and industry.

With M&A volume setting new records—over $5 trillion in deals in 2015, according to Dealogic—many branding, marketing, and communications professionals will be charged with implementing a rebranding project during their careers. Executives often ask me what the key is to setting up for success of a rebranding implementation. My answer is straightforward: Explore rebranding implications as soon as regulatory oversight and review of the deal begin.

With the flood of change in healthcare today, you could forgive consumers if they cited “confusion” rather than “clarity” to describe how they feel about the future of their insurance coverage. With the constant reshaping of plans and programs, patients easily get disoriented, whether before, during, or after a trip through the system. This is especially true if they or their loved ones are medically stressed or handicapped.