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Brand Implementation

With M&A volume setting new records—over $5 trillion in deals in 2015, according to Dealogic—many branding, marketing, and communications professionals will be charged with implementing a rebranding project during their careers. Executives often ask me what the key is to setting up for success of a rebranding implementation. My answer is straightforward: Explore rebranding implications as soon as regulatory oversight and review of the deal begin.

With the flood of change in healthcare today, you could forgive consumers if they cited “confusion” rather than “clarity” to describe how they feel about the future of their insurance coverage. With the constant reshaping of plans and programs, patients easily get disoriented, whether before, during, or after a trip through the system. This is especially true if they or their loved ones are medically stressed or handicapped.

We all know about Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will.” In the course of many rebrandings, we’ve uncovered a few examples. In one case, just before the grand opening of a new location—at which a new sign was to be unveiled at just the right moment—the sign vendor shipped the wrong sign cover.

How does a global company roll out “the next new thing?” Deploy it in hundreds of offices? In dozens of countries? To legions of employees? To thousands of customers and prospects? These days, corporations rely on analytics and sophisticated logistics that drive thousands of point decisions in parallel.

When architects create a conceptual design for a structure, they talk with clients, take a few measurements, and come up with a floor plan that documents a grand strategy. But the initial plan, even once approved, remains pie in the sky until a host of added data and additional measurements are obtained. Builders of the new structure will need specifics on everything from building materials to electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and so on. Only when they get the so-called “working drawings” can they get started with moving dirt, pouring concrete, and erecting walls.