Get a good read on us.

Latest posts

Our competitive global economy — ripe for major transactions including mergers, acquisitions, splits spin-offs and affiliations — means every chief marketer can expect to manage a complex, large-scale rebranding at some point in his or her career. However, it is common for executives charged with leading a brand change to lack a clear line of sight into the financial and operational implications involved in these complex projects — even with a great depth of knowledge about the company and industry.

When we work with clients during a rebranding, we often evaluate three different approaches, each with increasing cost and impact: “bronze,” “silver,” and “gold.” But you probably wonder: How often does a client choose just one of these options for all branded assets? Almost never.

With M&A volume setting new records—over $5 trillion in deals in 2015, according to Dealogic—many branding, marketing, and communications professionals will be charged with implementing a rebranding project during their careers. Executives often ask me what the key is to setting up for success of a rebranding implementation. My answer is straightforward: Explore rebranding implications as soon as regulatory oversight and review of the deal begin.

We’ve seen it many times. Healthcare providers engaged in mergers and acquisitions embark on the implementation for a rebranding only to get stymied by unforeseen stakeholder concerns. What sets healthcare rebrandings apart from others is that hospitals and health systems face more potential issues because of the number and nature of constituencies involved.

When Fortune 50 clients like Hewlett-Packard and Verizon consider engaging BrandActive, they often have one critical question on their mind - how much is their rebrand going to cost? It doesn’t matter if it’s a merger, acquisition, or rebranding of an existing enterprise, executives are eager to know what the price tag will be to move out the old and bring in the new.