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Brand Change

If your energy firm is like most, it’s structured as a B2B enterprise. Management emphasizes sales and building relationships with a core set of customers. Brand often takes a back seat. So, when the business needs to rebrand because of a transaction or new business strategy, brand marketers can find it difficult to convey the strategic and financial value of brand and the need to properly fund brand conversion. Those marketers who can put rebranding implementation into financial terms, addressing cost management and ROI, have a head start. They can turn brand change into an opportunity to move forward with strategic brand priorities.

Your transition team may be breathing a collective sigh of relief: With the brand strategy and new design approved and in hand, you’ve turned your attention to rebranding high-profile items such as signage and the website. Not that the project is close to complete, of course. Marketing still needs to rebrand digital collateral, but that shouldn’t be hard. Once a full inventory is in hand, it’s just a matter of swapping out logos, right? NewCo (the merged entity) is almost ready for business!

There’s nothing like a rebrand effort to make you appreciate the extent of your branded assets.

Planning for the rollout of a new identity demands an accurate inventory and accounting of each and every instance of your company name, logo and colors across your portfolio. Your team must think beyond the obvious digital and physical marketing collateral — signage, fleet, badges, uniforms and more, depending on your industry.

We all know about Murphy’s Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will.” In the course of many rebrandings, we’ve uncovered a few examples. In one case, just before the grand opening of a new location—at which a new sign was to be unveiled at just the right moment—the sign vendor shipped the wrong sign cover.

When architects create a conceptual design for a structure, they talk with clients, take a few measurements, and come up with a floor plan that documents a grand strategy. But the initial plan, even once approved, remains pie in the sky until a host of added data and additional measurements are obtained. Builders of the new structure will need specifics on everything from building materials to electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and so on. Only when they get the so-called “working drawings” can they get started with moving dirt, pouring concrete, and erecting walls.